Reba Sings “The Lord’s Prayer” at Bush Funeral… Brings Family to Tears

Kirsters Baish| With the passing of former President George H.W. Bush on November 30, Americans gathered together to remember the man who once led our country.

CBS News reported that former Secretary of State James Baker stated of Bush, “He looked up at me, opened both eyes looked at me, and said, ‘Jim, where are we going?’ And I said, ‘Well, Jefe’ — because that’s what I called him, ‘Jefe,’ which is Spanish for ‘chief’ — I said, ‘Well, Jefe, we’re going to heaven.’”

“He said, ‘That’s where I want to go.’”

UPI reports that country superstar Reba McEntire was one of Bush’s fondest admirers, and for years, she has not been shy about her personal admiration for the 41st President.

 

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My favorite. #greatpresident #greatfriend

A post shared by Reba (@reba) on

The day after Bush passed, Reba took to Instagram to share a photograph of herself and the former President. The caption read, “My favorite. #greatpresident #greatfriend.”

To honor her hero, Reba sang her version of “The Lord’s Prayer” at his funeral service, which was held at Houston’s St. Martin’s Episcopal Church.

Reba showed up in an elegant black dress and delivered her rendition of the piece.

Liftable reports:

Only the slight twang in her diction betrayed her pop-country musical roots. Though a consummate professional, McEntire seemed to struggle somewhat during the performance.

She paused to clear her throat during the song’s opening lines. And after singing the words, “Forgive us our debts as we forgive our debtors,” she turned her head to the side, dropped her eyes and swallowed hard.

McEntire wasn’t the only one struggling emotionally. Cameras cut to the family as she sang, showing George W. Bush wiping his eyes.

Reba wasn’t alone in performing at the services. The late former President’s favorites, the Oak Ridge Boys sang “Amazing Grace” at his service.

“He always taught us to do the right thing, and it is a tremendous honor,” band member Richard Sterban explained to the Tennessean. “One final time here on this earth, we’re going to sing it for him and we believe in our hearts we’ll see him again one day and we’ll sing it for him again,” he continued.